Cuchulain

Cuchulain2021-09-17T13:10:12+00:00

Project Description

Similar Artists: Randy Newman, Bahamas, Father John Misty

Cuchulain — a low-voiced songsmith with a wry sense of humor – has a big name to fill. Cuchulain (pronounced “ka-hoo-lin”) was named (yes, by his parents) after the famous Irish mythological hero. As he explains, “Every Irish person knows this name, but no one is named it. It’s like naming your kid Hercules or Jesus.” The name is translated to “Hound of Chulainn” in Gaelic and inspired the name of his previous musical project Handsome Hound.

And like his mythological namesake, Cuchulain has journeyed far and wide, finding himself and his songs shaped by each place he stops. He has honed his genre-bending version of folk music by incorporating the sounds of his many hometowns.

RELEASES

“Don’t Come Easy” (Single)
Release Date: September 17, 2021

Cuchulain releases the genre-bending single, “Don’t Come Easy.” feat. Handsome Hound on September 17. This is the second single off FEAT, his album of long-distance pandemic collaborations due out Nov 5. This one started as a dialogue with himself – “relax, don’t overthink it / well baby, it don’t come easy for me.” But as this song took shape in June 2020 amidst the BLM protests over George Floyd’s murder, the second verse took on a different meaning. All sounds were recorded in home studios (trumpet on an iPhone) in Oregon, Texas, DC, & California. Cuchulain’s wife on background vocals and the trumpeter were in Handsome Hound with him.  The result is a joyful orchestra of sounds laying the bedrock for Cuchulain’s soothing, yet upbeat melody.

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Bio

Cuchulain -- a low-voiced songsmith with a wry sense of humor – has a big name to fill. Cuchulain (pronounced “ka-hoo-lin”) was named (yes, by his parents) after the famous Irish mythological hero. As he explains, “Every Irish person knows this name, but no one is named it. It’s like naming your kid Hercules or Jesus.” The name is translated to “Hound of Chulainn” in Gaelic and inspired the name of his previous musical project Handsome Hound.

And like his mythological namesake, Cuchulain has journeyed far and wide, finding himself and his songs shaped by each place he stops. He has honed his genre-bending version of folk music by incorporating the sounds of his many hometowns.

Born and raised in rural South Carolina, Cuchulain has roots in a folksy sound with a hint of twang. He says, “My first musical memories were singing in the church choir and garage band rehearsals at my house.” That mix of musical styles contributes to his current genre-melding sound.

He says, “My life has taken me around the world and back, and those experiences, those places, and the people in those places have influenced the sound of my music.”  When Cuchulain lived in Paris, his songs were homesick and sentimental. When he lived in DC through the 2016 election, he wrote political and protest songs on his debut solo album, Cuchulain. When he lived in the Bay Area, he wrote and recorded his recent album, Songs for Grownups, a rock opera filled with critique of late capitalism and tech. That album’s single “I Prefer My Phone” drew the attention of NPR Music, who said his Tiny Desk Contest performance “gave ‘one-man-band’ a whole new meaning,” referencing his performance of all instruments (guitar, bass, piano, and drums) in the video.

FEAT will be Cuchulain’s third album, a collaborative project in which every song features a guest artist, musical friends he has met through his wide-spanning travels. Cuchulain currently lives in Eugene, Oregon, which inspired the first tune on this album, “Good Morning, Eugene.” The full album comes out November 5th, 2021 with a regional Pacific Northwest tour in support.

"Today's #DeskOfTheDay gives ‘one-man-band’ a whole new meaning. Watch "I Prefer My Phone," a 2021 Tiny Desk Contest entry from @CuchulainK” - NPR Music, June 23, 2021

NPR Music

“Charming and poignant Americana.”

Glide Magazine

"There’s a Leonard Cohen cadence and observational wit at play, filtered through Cuchulain‘s voice that recalls Evan Dando of The Lemonheads. It's a clever and lyrically impressive track that rolls along perfectly like a Randy Newman lost gem."

Chris Familton, Post to Wire

TOUR DATES