David Climaco Garcia

David Climaco Garcia2021-05-06T12:41:07+00:00

Project Description

Similar Artists: Tom Waits, Sturgill Simpson, Hiss Golden Messenger

David Climaco Garcia emerges from a mid-century highway culture that still dominates the American imagination. The Albuquerque-based songwriter draws from New Mexico’s Southwestern Americana, a blend of classic cowboy and country sensibilities mixed with his own Spanish and Native American lineage. Garcia says, “Growing up in Albuquerque, you’d be caught between these extreme down-and-dirty vibes that ranged from hip hop, punk rock, and a trucker meth culture that were all in your face and hard to escape, but it’s a really vibrant and multicultural city that I just feel at home and grounded in.”  

Garcia spent many years hitchhiking around the American West, which lends to a dusty, down-and-out vibe in his songs. He says, “My career path has been so completely off any logical map, and my work carries the baggage of my years of wandering and living on the edge.” He’s slept in bushes in Seattle’s Gasworks Park and dodged cowboys trying to seduce him after picking him up hitching through Texas. He’s burned up the boulevards of San Francisco’s outer districts on a classic BMW cafe racer and wandered the Tenderloin on one of the many hard drugs on offer to the young and tragically hip. He says, “Much of my life has been a Kerouacian fever-dream that I’m lucky to be alive to tell about.”  

RELEASES

“Riverside Home” (Single)
Release Date: April 22, 2021 (Bandcamp Only) / May G Official Release Date

Built on a traditional Irish ballad song structure, the single provides an interlude from grief through the comforts of nature. On April 22, the single will be released exclusively on Bandcamp in honor of Earth Day. Before the official May 6 release, proceeds will be donated to the non-profit wilderness advocacy group, New Mexico Wilderness Alliance.  The single is off the album, Between the Devil and Me, due out this summer. Read more

Bio

David Climaco Garcia emerges from a mid-century highway culture that still dominates the American imagination. The Albuquerque-based songwriter draws from New Mexico’s Southwestern Americana, a blend of classic cowboy and country sensibilities mixed with his own Spanish and Native American lineage. Garcia says, “Growing up in Albuquerque, you’d be caught between these extreme down-and-dirty vibes that ranged from hip hop, punk rock, and a trucker meth culture that were all in your face and hard to escape, but it’s a really vibrant and multicultural city that I just feel at home and grounded in.”  

Garcia spent many years hitchhiking around the American West, which lends to a dusty, down-and-out vibe in his songs. He says, “My career path has been so completely off any logical map, and my work carries the baggage of my years of wandering and living on the edge.” He’s slept in bushes in Seattle’s Gasworks Park and dodged cowboys trying to seduce him after picking him up hitching through Texas. He’s burned up the boulevards of San Francisco’s outer districts on a classic BMW cafe racer and wandered the Tenderloin on one of the many hard drugs on offer to the young and tragically hip. He says, “Much of my life has been a Kerouacian fever-dream that I’m lucky to be alive to tell about.”   

After dropping out of a classical acting program, Garcia began playing guitar and singing folk tunes in Boston’s subways. He says, “I left a full-ride scholarship with one year to go at Boston University for the open road and played bars and clubs and street corners.” 

After stints in Austin and the Northwest, he landed in the Bay Area as the 20th century was closing out and started a band called Lodi with a friend who went by the name Henry Moon. Garcia and Moon found their way into a studio in the muck of SF’s inner Mission district that Bill Putnam had built for John Coltrane in the sixties. Between assisting sessions with Neil Young, The Donnas, and Portishead’s Geoff Barrow, they recorded the album End of Land Sadness. The album was a fogbound twilight collection of songs of displacement and unrest.

As Lodi died in interpersonal flames, San Francisco’s Dot Com bubble burst, and the studio folded, Garcia started playing solo in folk clubs and cafes around the city. This was when he ran into seminal indie-folk queen Jolie Holland. She took him under her wing, and they would play shows together and hang out in a big artist collective house that she had commandeered in Pac Heights.

But the city was shrinking and imploding, and Garcia eventually ran back to the welcoming arms of the Southwest, where he found a film boom in New Mexico. Tired of being broke his entire life, he slipped into a career directing and producing commercials and documentary films. He says, “I put my guitar down for ten years and rarely even looked at it.” In 2012, he found himself singing and playing again after his father suddenly died of a rare form of cancer, and an eight-year relationship dissolved.  In the years since he’s been studying American music of all shapes and quietly building a catalog. In 2016 he started a band called Beloved with his wife Nikelle Garcia, a Celtic fiddler. The first outing for Beloved, called the Cabin Sessions, was a journey through Garcia’s best tunes recorded in a 100-year-old Cabin a block off Route 66 - America’s mother road.

Between the Devil and Me, Garcia’s upcoming solo album culminates his experiences confronting the demons of addiction, greed, and the hunger for love and acceptance. Garcia maps love, loss, and life wandering the American road, weaving in the environmental and social justice issues omnipresent in our culture. His story and songs are an invitation to join in the wanderlust.

TOUR DATES