The Corner Laughers

The Corner Laughers2020-03-24T13:22:39+00:00

Project Description

Similar Artists: Jenny Lewis, Belle & Sebastian, Essex Green

The Corner Laughers are not of this era. They are timeless, but far from “retro.” Yes, you will detect strains of English folk-psych (peak period Kinks by way of Fairport Convention, perhaps), vintage California sunshine pop and hints of alt-country twang. You may be reminded of the literate lyrics and soaring melodies of ’80s titans like XTC, Kirsty MacColl and Robyn Hitchcock, or the ’90s indie chamber pop of the likes of Belle & Sebastian. Kane’s lilt and uke might even lead one to expect a postmodern YouTube sensation (make no mistake, she was there first).

RELEASES

“The Accepted Time”
Release Date: April 17, 2020

Record Label: Big Stir Records

The Accepted Time Single Cover

“A Californian band who come across like a West Coast Belle and Sebastian. Their indie pop is sassy and smart, intelligent and intricate, twee with bite.” — The Guardian

A song for our times, The Corner Laughers’ “The Accepted Time” places the listener directly in the present moment, where magic exists if only you slow down to find it. It feels eternal, yet passes too quickly. There is innocence, yet wisdom. Anxiety and longing, yet optimism. It’s off the album Temescal Telegraph due out June 5. Read more

Temescal Telegraph
Release Date: June 5, 2020

Record Label: Big Stir Records

Corner Laughers - Temescal Telegraph Album Cover

California indie-pop band The Corner Laughers are back in action — exploring themes from climate change and pastoral ponderings to childhood to the nature of time itself. Temescal Telegraph, the new album out June 5 via Big Stir Records, stands as a lively testament to the longtime band being back in full bloom. 

Temescal Telegraph plays with micro and macro lenses, connecting detailed personal experiences with the cosmic scale. Expect to encounter bees in harmony, environmental apocalypse, ghosts, trains, witches, fallen leaves and omniscient vultures. Current issues meet ancient echoes. Moods meander between wistful melancholy and exhilaration. A simple walk home becomes an entire universe encapsulated in a moment. To quote one of its songs, “It’s alright to care.”

Read more

Bio

Longtime California indie-pop band The Corner Laughers are back in action – exploring themes from climate change to childhood to the nature of time itself,

After 2015’s critically acclaimed “Matilda Effect” and leader Karla Kane’s 2017 solo debut, the future of The Corner Laughers was unclear. Circumstances of geography, health and other life complications conspired to push the tight-knit quartet temporarily apart. Temescal Telegraph, the new album out soon via Big Stir Records, stands as a joyful testament to the band being back in full bloom. 

While past projects have drawn from a variety of guest contributions from around the globe, for their 2020 return, Kane (vocals, ukulele and most songwriting), Charlie Crabtree (drums) KC Bowman and Khoi Huynh (sharing guitar, bass and piano duties) recorded their new LP quickly and entirely in the intimate setting of Bowman’s Timber Trout studio. Set in the Temescal neighborhood of Oakland, the result is fostered in an organic, cohesive and present sound. 

But now, as at the start, they are not of this era. They are timeless, but far from “retro.” Yes, you will detect strains of English folk-psych (peak period Kinks by way of Fairport Convention, perhaps), vintage California sunshine pop and hints of alt-country twang. You may be reminded of the literate lyrics and soaring melodies of ’80s titans like XTC, Kirsty MacColl and Robyn Hitchcock, or the ’90s indie chamber pop of the likes of Belle & Sebastian. Kane’s lilt and uke might even lead one to expect a postmodern YouTube sensation (make no mistake, she was there first).

With the exception of that last one, none of those touchstones are, strictly speaking, off base. But they’re not why a Corner Laughers record will leave you feeling temporally displaced in an eerily giddy manner. That’s down to the songs, built upon what Icon Magazine calls a “nigh-on-perfect fusion of bubblegum-sweet tunefulness and clever, subtly barbed lyrics.” 

Temescal Telegraph plays with micro and macro lenses, connecting detailed personal experiences with the cosmic scale. Expect to encounter bees in harmony, ghosts, fallen leaves and omniscient vultures. Current issues meet ancient echoes. Moods meander between wistful melancholy and exhilaration. A simple walk home becomes an entire universe encapsulated in a moment. To quote one of its songs, “It’s alright to care.”

These are works full of wit and whimsy which might easily be unfolding “anywhen”, or in several epochs at once. They’re all strikingly immediate, but thoroughly unanchored to any conventional notion of “now.” And that’s the thematic thread tying together Temescal Telegraph — a notion of the present alongside, or perhaps even versus, the eternal. It promises, like all of their records, to be a lovely era in which to lose oneself.

The Guardian

“A Californian band who come across like a West Coast Belle and Sebastian. Their indie pop is sassy and smart, intelligent and intricate, twee with bite.”

Paul Lester, The Guardian

“Armed to the teeth with sharp observations and whimsical wanderings, with a genius for dreamy melodies.”

Louder than War
Bitch

“Kane’s conversational vocal tone and her storytelling chops are reminiscent of The Mountain Goats’ John Darnielle. Musically, though, their bright harmonies make them sound a lot more like Belle & Sebastian with a little more jangle and a little more twang.”

Bitch Magazine

TOUR DATES